It Only Takes A Spark

Our faith community has grown and changed.  We’ve adapted and reconsidered.  We’ve gone with our strengths and learned from each other.  A little more than two years in and together we have created a strong and vibrant community of faith.  What Jeff and I began laying out in written proposals 3 years ago is now a reality.  Sometimes I can’t believe it’s real. Now it’s time for us to dream again.  We are crafting a new proposal for the next 5 years.  July 2016- June 2021.  Wow, even as I write that number, the year 2021, I feel like the future is so close and yet so far.  We have some great ideas brewing, like a Sunday morning brunch church, a dinner at a local restaurant instead of in our home, and opening a community laundromat.  We are meeting as a faith community next week to dream together and to think about what we will look like in 2021.  3 years ago Jeff and I were alone in our dreaming and holy scheming.  Now we have a team of others who hear God’s call in their lives and are showing us parts of the future we weren’t aware of until now. Please pray for us as we listen and dream and allow our holy imaginations to flow. -Eilidh It only takes a little creative spark to kindle holy...

Come To Me

This month at the Sellwood Faith Community we have been discussing the rhythms of life.  From the seasons of the year to the pace of the everyday, we are challenged to find the Holy Moments in the midst of our busyness.  This part of October always seems to be a challenge for me, lots of extra meetings added to my schedule and a seemingly unending amount of requests for me to volunteer somewhere.  It all can be a bit much but I also know that in talking to others that I am not alone. Trying to find rest in the midst of a full schedule is a challenge.  One thing that has worked for me in the past is listening to music.  When I was younger that was pretty much all I did but as I have aged I seem to listen to music for enjoyment less and less.  Every once in a while I find a song that I connect with deeply and that helps me connect with God.  Recently it is a song called Come to Me by Christopher Grundy.  Its a beautiful yet simple song based on Matthew 11:28, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.”  There is something about this combination of music and words that has really helped me connect with this scripture this month and it gives perspective on the challenges in the next couple of weeks.  Finding a song is one way that helps me measure the rhythms of my life. That’s what I am listening to, what song have you connected with lately?...

Sacred Ordinary Days

So often it seems like the very thing I need is what the group at Sellwood Faith Community also longs to engage.  As we were brainstorming our theme for this month we talked about lots of options.  One of our new ladies, Colleen, suggested that we talk about Halloween and holidays.  Around the table this idea morphed into an examination of the rhythm of life.  So this month we are looking at the seasons and days and patterns of our existence from a spiritual viewpoint.  We’re starting with the notion of sabbath and branching in to the church calendar and holidays, including Halloween. For me this comes at a much needed time.   You see right now I feel inadequate about lots of things.  Then Facebook so kindly reminded me that two years ago this week we celebrated the end of my dad’s chemo.  So yes I’m grieving and the news of shootings and refugees and deep brokenness adds to my sense of being kind of lost.   However, I am, as they say in South Pacific, a cockeyed optimist which means that rather than sit in this place of woe and wallow I know what I need is a plan. This is actually the point of those rhythms of life we are studying this month.  The days of our lives when structured in faith offer a plan, a framework to move us forward when we are stuck or lost.  The rhythm of life also helps us learn who we are and helps us celebrate the goodness of life.  We have Lent where we practice giving something up so...

The Flow of Sundays

One of the things that people seem to have the hardest time with about our model, aside from the no building, not worshiping Sunday morning thing is how our Sunday dinner works. Folks are horrified that I am regularly cooking for 10-15 people. My reassurance that I just make pasta or soup and everyone else brings things doesn’t seem to work. “But how do you coordinate that, how do you make sure people are bringing the right things?” I laugh and tell them about the awesome dinner where we had four loaves of bread. People bring what they bring. I usually have extra bread in the freezer for communion, some lettuce in the fridge, and a dessert up my sleeve somewhere. If we had folks come with nothing I could throw together a meal, but that never happens. Last night I added salad because we had three wonderful fall pastas full of sausage and roasted veg and I wanted salad with them. We never leave the table hungry. Sure the combos we end up with aren’t on the menu of your favorite restaurant, but I think they reflect the body of Christ at it’s best. The next question I get has to do with what we do at dinner. We begin with prayer and candle lighting. We’ve sung the same prayer since our early days. I made up little table tents so everyone would have the words. In the last few months we’ve been lighting the candles on the table as we sing, signaling Christ’s presence with us. We begin serving each other and eating dinner while we have...