Blog

We believe our stories, the stories of the neighbors with whom we are in relationship, and the stories we read in scripture are vital in shaping the way we see and understand God’s presence in the world. This is one of the many places we gather to share the story of the people of the Sellwood Faith Community.


Finding the Sacred

When we gather each week something holy happens around the table sharing a meal and discussing scripture.  I feel God’s transcendent presence so vibrantly during our singing time each week. These experiences aren’t the fullness of spiritual experience.  We find God in our midst on the Worship Walks as we pause and pray in nature.  We are challenged in our beliefs at Spiritually Thirsty in ways that make our spirits grow.  There is a holiness to our work as we bag potatoes or cook a meal for our hungry neighbors.  And God dwells among us in the quiet and reflection of our monthly Taize worship experience. This year a new member of SFC is leading Taize at her home, so for the first time this month I got to go and just be in the worship space.  The altar tables were beautifully yet simply prepared with cloths, crosses, and candles.  The songs and scriptures had been thoughtfully chosen.  For 45 minutes I surrendered everything to just be in the moment.  It was a powerful time of rest and spiritual restoration.  I sat in the silence, I prayed holding a roughly finished clay cross from Cuba, I lit candles, I sang, and I listened. Our community ins’t just about one type of spiritual expression. It’s important that we have times of discussion of scripture and times to enter into the holy mystery of sacred ritual.  I am so grateful for the diverse leadership of this Parish and the many ways I get to nourish my soul through this community. -Eilidh...

Leader Party

I was in a training program called multiplying ministries last year where we learned about how to develop leadership within churches. One of the most brilliant ideas was around celebration. So this past Thursday we gathered a collection of leaders from Trinity and Sellwood Faith Community to celebrate the many years of leadership that they have provided to the Parish. We had treats and flowers to help set the celebratory mood.  As we began our time together folks introduced themselves since we had people who had never met in the room. Then Amanda explained part of the community organizing process and what it meant to have one to ones. A one to one is basically an intentional conversation. Folks listen without comment as one person shares and then they switch the listening and talking roles. The great thing about this gathering was it was a time to celebrate and to help leadership begin practicing some of the community organizing principles that we hope to use to shape our ministry in the neighborhood.  We had three opportunities for one to ones during our party. The first question we focused on was what is giving you life in your ministry area. As I shared I got goose bumps really thinking about all the life giving ministry already unfolding like new relationships being built, new moms coming to coffee, the way my sabbath schedule was grounding me for my work, and how great it has been to get back to preaching.  After the conversations we shared those things that really impacted us with the larger group.  It was lovely to celebrate the...

Nice

Last month I got to participate in the Transforming Ministries 5 conference.  This is a time for pastors to listen to the stories of innovative and creative business people and then spend some time translating the secular to the sacred. One of the speakers was from Nike.  He has held a variety of jobs with the company over the years, but through all of them he saw a uniting thread in what he calls design thinking.  My favorite thing he said was that the word nice comes from the latin root nescire, meaning not to know or to ignore.  How often do we ignore a problem or not say what we really think because we want to be nice?  He said that empathy and compassion are part of the creative process, but being nice has no place. This is once of my favorite themes because I think that niceness has no place in the church.  The church is not a place for the agreeable or the well behaved, which happen to be the dictionary definitions of nice. So often I have had people sitting in my office saying they couldn’t really voice their doubts or share their spiritual journeys in church because they didn’t want to offend other people.  Parishioners are so interested in making nice with one another that they develop superficial relationships rather than sharing the full beauty of themselves in God. So at Sellwood we’re not nice.  We love each other, we care about each other, we walk with one another, and we listen to each other, but we don’t ignore what is in our hearts and minds.  We ask hard...

If You Build It They Will Come

Over our 4 years here at SFC we have had people find us online, by our chalkboard sign, from meet-up groups we run, and through word of mouth.  Folks seeking something have been stirred by the words on our sign or found on our website a glimpse of what they know to be true about God and life. Now that we are part of the SE Portland Parish people are finding us because we have a church building that is home to many community groups.  This week it was the family of a young man who died suddenly. Folks from the family participate in one of the groups and when they had no where else to turn for a funeral they called me. The attractional model of church growth holds that if we have the right programs folks will come to our churches. I’ve been in churches that have movie nights or game days to try to get people in the doors.  What I’ve found is that people aren’t looking for entertainment.  Folks are looking for a place that offers meaning, hope, community, a life line, solace, grace, challenge, connection, and accountability. For far too long in my ministry I have been in the bait and switch business.  Advertise a fun program and stick in a little Jesus.  What I have learned is that people don’t need that, in fact it smacks of dishonesty.  So we lead with Jesus.  I’ve had more people participate in the life of this faith community because of the words “You Are Enough” that we put on our sign than in any of the time I’ve...

Environment Matters

A couple of weeks ago I got to participate in Transforming Ministries 5.  This conference brings together around 50 clergy to listen to amazing stories from secular businesses as a catalyst for us to create new ministries for our communities.  This year we got to hear from the historian for McMenamins.  If you are not from the Northwest you might not know that this is a beer company that takes over old, historic buildings and gives them new life as breweries, bars, restaurants, hotels, and concert venues.  Their motto from their website states, “McMenamins has been a neighborhood gathering spot throughout Oregon and Washington since 1983. We handcraft our own beer, wine, cider, spirits and coffee. We offer an eclectic mix of pubs, historic hotels, movie theaters, concert venues, spas, events and just pure fun—join in!”  Take a look at all they have to offer here. It was fascinating to hear the historian talk about the Kennedy School, the hotel that had once been a neighborhood school.  The care taken with the art, the color scheme, and the maintenance of connection to the history of the community made the space a vibrant place to spend time.  The company understands that the environment matters.  People are more likely to relax, hang out, and tell stories in a apace that feels comfortable and interesting.  McMennamins is know for their artworks much of it murals that have a particular aesthetic that celebrate the location or stories connected to a place.  Their goal of being a neighborhood gathering spot means they create space where people want to come and connect.  They do this through the aesthetics and feel of the places they create. As I think about how this translates to...

Hear Us When We Cannot Cry

This morning my devotional was Psalm 28 and Genesis 39:1-23.   As I read Psalm 28 I thought about how the words of this Psalm could be used by those who are filled with hate and white nationalist pride, “The Lord is the strength of his people; he is the saving refuge of his anointed.  O save your people, and bless your heritage; be their shepherd, and carry them for ever.”  Those who talk about white heritage and see themselves as special in the eyes of God because of their skin tone could use these words to justify their views.  These same words could also be taken up by those who denounce hate, who call upon God’s long history of bringing justice for the poor and marginalized as the true heritage of God.  This is one of the problems of the bible, we can read it and have it confirm our views, rather than wrestling with the text. For me the wrestling with Psalm 28 comes in the stanza above the one I cited earlier.  This stanza is all about how God will punish the wicked and give them their due reward.  They will be broken down and repaid for their evil actions.  I am much more comfortable with the image of a gracious and forgiving God, so this sentiment from the psalm makes me uncomfortable.  Then I think about the men being called out by their employers, families, and universities for terrorizing Charlottesville this week and I begin to see the justice in the consequences.  Yet it still makes me uncomfortable.  What if the wrong person gets identified?  Is harassing people on the...

Press Clippings

The local newspaper wrote an article about the Southeast Portland Parish. Check it out here: http://pamplinmedia.com/sb/74-news/367700-249074-changes-spark-innovation-at-sellwood-and-woodstock-churches...

Trying New Things

On Sunday we had brunch at Trinity.  This was a big deal because it was the first time the congregation had done anything like this.  We set up tables in the back of the sanctuary and rigged up a sound system for Jeff’s guitar.  We sang together, prayed together, ate together, and discussed the scripture together.  It was awesome. I wasn’t sure how the folks would feel about it.  Most people’s reaction to the idea of eating during worship is one of scandal.  It seems so foreign to how we behave during our worship time.  In fact I once served a church where the ushers would actually kick anyone with food, drinks, or even gum out of the sanctuary during worship.  So it is totally understandable that people who have been in those sorts of church cultures would balk at the idea that worship for this Sunday actually features and promotes eating in the sanctuary. No matter how much reproach or uncertainty that meets the idea what I have found is that when we get to the actual experience it is magical. Every church I have served in the past 12 years has shared a meal during worship and the holiness of those experiences were transformational for the communities. This Sunday at Trinity was no different.  I was at a table with two young families and it was the 3rd grader who brought the most spiritually deep insight on the scripture to us.  It was amazing to see deeper connections forming between the folks at all the tables.  At the end of the worship time during the announcements one...

Getting in the Groove

As I work on the August calendar I am realizing that month number one of the Southeast Portland Parish is coming to a close.  We have a long way to go until we have everything figured out and in place, but we are definitely getting in to the groove of what it means to be the church in this way in this place. Amanda and I have both had a chance to preach and we’ve been able to share the sermon time together effectively on two other Sundays.  We are finding our pattern of how we share our vision and how God is speaking through us with the people of the Parish. Coming in August Paige, Jeff’s and my daughter, will preach one of the Sundays, August 13th.  When we were planning the schedule back in May she asked when she could speak, so of course we gave her a time.  It will be fascinating to hear her perspective on our faith community and to contemplate her vision of the future.  We will continue to share the pulpit with others over the coming months including my coach Nicole Reilley in December. After taking a little bit of a break from normal programming at SFC we are starting back up our Worship Walks, Taize Worship, an Spiritually Thirsty.  The first Worship Walk will be August 19th at 10am at Elk Rock Garden.  We will be reveling in nature and sharing scripture, poetry, and spiritual insights as we walk the garden.  Taize will be back in September, with an evening gathering at the SFC house once a month.  This is a...

Seeing Beyond The Moment

I just got back from a Disney Cruise to Alaska with my mom, my aunt, and my daughter.  It was a lovely time and one of the best vacations I have ever had.  We saw amazing shows, ate well, got to see glaciers, whales, eagles, seals, and icebergs, we visited interesting towns, and got to learn about the history and peoples of Alaska. I come home relaxed, a few pounds heavier, and thankful for the wonderful time with my family. And I come home thinking about the way our world works, aware of my own privilege and the ways that I want to interact with people. There’s a lot I don’t know about the people working for Disney that I met over the last few days. I do know that almost all of the people working as servers and room stewards are people of color while the cruise staff and cast members are almost all white. I know that I know nothing about what it might be like to be from Thailand or Indonesia or the Philippines and to work serving the largely white, largely American guests of the ship.  It was also interesting to notice the way the cast members who performed and stared in the shows were ignored when they were acting as character hosts.  When someone is on stage we see them in one way, when they are telling us it’s our turn to meet Mickey Mouse we almost see through them. So while I come home thankful and happy I also come home unsettled.  Is this the world I think God would imagine?  How do I...

Slow Your Roll

This moth we are beginning the work of living in to this new, collaborative ministry at the Southeast Portland Parish.   As we do this work it would be easy to let it swallow us whole.  So Amanda, Jeff, and I are intentionally working to make time to slow down and take breaks.  We each have some time off planned, to unplug and appreciate the things we love.  Amanda and I are also taking some retreat time together to let God speak to us in the wild beauty of Timothy Lake.  It is important to take this sabbath time to rest in God, to take time to enjoy life and be with the people we love. May you find time this summer to slow down and create space to see more deeply and breath more easily....

We Are In This Together

 On Sunday afternoon I was completely out of energy.  This past week had been fairly intense.  It’s lots of work to move in to a new office and get all the pieces in place to pull off that first worship experience.  Physically I was tired from all the moving and unpacking.  Emotionally I was tired from the energy poured out to meet and connect with new folks.  Mentally I was tired from all the writing and planning we had done.  I was worried dinner would be a disaster. And then my family got home from their trip and began the work of setting up for the meal.  I walked to the store to buy some food and by the time I got home everything was ready.  When people began to arrive I felt like myself again. This work we do can be a heavy burden, but the thing I have learned is that I do not do it alone.  I can’t.  This is why our proposal for the Southeast Portland Parish included 3 clergy.  It takes a team to do this sort of creative, innovative work.  When I am depleted and out of ideas, Jeff and Amanda are there to carry on while I recover for a minute.  It’s not just times of low energy when we need the team.  Every idea we have is better when the three of us collaborate and discuss the idea together.  We bring our own perspectives and end up with a more complete idea than if just one of us was working alone. It’s not just with the staff that we work as...

Singing a New Song

Today as I finally finished setting up my work space in the new collaborative Southeast Portland Parish office at Trinity UMC I set aside some time for my daily devotionals.  The psalm for the day is 86 and my reading began with: Teach me your way, O Lord, that I may walk in your truth; I instantly started singing a song that I learned when we served the church in Yakima.  When we sang that same song, Cry of My Heart, at the church in Veneta we sang it a little differently.  With our worship leaders guiding us it took on a more gospel feel than the slightly edgy rock way the worship band did it in Yakima. As we begin a new adventure this week with the Southeast Portland Parish I know that I will learn to sing old songs in new ways.  I will also learn new songs.  One of the most rich spiritual gifts of the SFC community for me has been the music that one of our leaders, Ace Waters, brings to our gatherings.  So many weeks I find myself in tears as we sing.  Sometimes the music he chooses speaks to the pain of losing someone, or reminds me of the way our world cries for justice, or stirs my soul with hopefulness as we sing of God’s grace. And the tears flow as the music transcends the moment and unites our community in the spirit. Sometimes when singing old songs in new ways I want to do it the old way, the way that reminds me of the past and the people who I once...

Summer Art

This summer my daughter and I are focusing on art.  She was really hoping to have an art class during the school year, but wound up in other awesome electives instead.  This week we are engaging with landscape art.  I have a friend who is a painter and she is hosting us in her backyard, teaching Paige how to think about perspective, light, and lines. As I’ve watched a scene emerge from a blank canvas I’ve been thinking about learning by trying, which is basically my ministry philosophy.  My friend has been painting for years, so she intuitively knows how to shadow a hillside or bring clouds to life.  For my daughter this painting is about experiential learning.  When she started mixing colors she was conservative in her approach, yielding a tiny batch of a particular shade.  She struggled to achieve her design with such little paint, so began to be more and more liberal with her portions as she mixed. My friend could have simply told her to use more, but letting Paige figure it our for herself is a much more rewarding experience for everyone in the end.  My daughter did get frustrated at points. This was when Nancy, who is a good teacher, began to ask questions.  “What do you think will happen if you do that?”  “What do you see?”  She also was encouraging, saying things like, “You are developing such a great eye.”  or “I love the movement in this section.” I do not expect Paige’s painting to be a masterpiece.  Just like her first poem or song or story wasn’t.  Just like my...

Setting Up Shop

This week I’ve packed two boxes and bought a standing desk.  Amanda and I have talked about the art work we’ll be hanging in our new collaborative office at Trinity UMC and we have an appointment next week to buy chairs. We’ll be liberating her table from the SFC house basement.  It will be used as a space for meeting and dreaming together and with leadership teams. It’s exciting to be in this not quite yet place.  We’re making plans and setting up systems and ways of being.  It’s a time of possibility and potential.  I have this frission of excitement in me, and a little bit of nervousness.   I know that in the next few months I am going to learn a ton. We are ready to begin and that is a beautiful thing.  I can’t wait to share with you about the new life of the Southeast Portland Parish as we launch on July 1!   -Eilidh...

Those Pesky Details

One of the more experimental parts of our life as a new church has been the administration piece. With the new Southeast Portland Parish we had to think through all sorts of issues.  How was money going to be handled between the two groups?  Who was responsible for the SFC house and the insurance and property taxes that go along with the house?  Once we came up with a way forward that led to all sorts of other questions, such as how to incorporate a faith community.  I’m learning a lot about all of these things and while we have amazing conference staff walking with us we are not their only responsibility. Right now the plan is that Trinity UMC will open a new checking account that will be for payroll.  Both SFC and Trinity will pay in to that account, Trinity at the amount they are paying for their current pastoral staff package and SFC for the rest of Amanda, Jeff and my salaries.  For those super in to numbers, Trinity is paying about 36% of the total cost for the three of us, which means the rest is coming from the grant we received and the giving of SFC.  This helps both faith communities to retain control of their assets and as we begin life together it is important that each side feel safe. Trinity has a large endowment and SFC has a substantial balance we are bringing in due to our frugal spending and the generous giving of our folks over the past 4 years.  Once we are clear about the way forward maybe we can...